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Tech World Breaking News| Future Information Technology News

Facebook Gave Data Access to Chinese Firm Flagged by U.S. Intelligence

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Facebook has data-sharing partnerships with at least four Chinese electronics companies, including a manufacturing giant that has a close relationship with China’s government, the social media company said on Tuesday. The agreements, which date to at least 2010, gave private access to some user data to Huawei, a telecommunications equipment company that has been flagged by American intelligence officials as a national security threat, as well as to Lenovo, Oppo and TCL. The four partnerships remain in effect, but Facebook officials said in an interview that the company would wind down the Huawei deal by the end of the week. Facebook gave access to the Chinese gadget makers along with other manufacturers — including Amazon, Apple, BlackBerry and Samsung — whose agreements were disclosed by The New York Times on Sunday. The deals were component of an effort to push more mobile users onto the social network starting in 2007, before stand-alone Facebook apps worked well on phones. The agreements permitted gadgets makers to offer some Facebook features, such as address books, “like” buttons and status updates. Facebook officials said the agreements with the Chinese companies permitted them access familiar to what was offered to BlackBerry, which could retrieve detailed information
Tech World Breaking News| Future Information Technology News

Facebook gave device makers deep access to data on users, friends

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As Facebook sought to become the world’s dominant social media service, it struck agreements permitting phone and other device-makers access to vast amounts of its users’ personal information. Facebook has reached data-sharing partnerships with at least 60 gadget-makers — including Apple, Amazon, BlackBerry, Microsoft and Samsung — during the last decade, starting before Facebook apps were widely available on smartphones, company officials said. The deals, most of which remain in effect, permitted Facebook to expand its reach and let device-makers offer customers famous features of the social network, such as messaging, “like” buttons and address books. But the partnerships, whose scope has not previously been reported, raise concerns about the company’s privacy protections and compliance with a 2011 consent decree with the Federal Trade Commission. Facebook permitted the device companies access to the data of users’ friends without their explicit consent, even after declaring that it would no longer share such information with outsiders. Some device-makers could retrieve personal information even from users’ friends who trusted they had barred any sharing, The New York Times found. Facebook came under intensifying scrutiny by lawmakers and regulators after news reports in March that a political consulting firm, Cambridge Analytica, misused the private information of
Tech World Breaking News| Future Information Technology News

Scientist demands protection for historical sites on other planets

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For all the best things humans have proficient on Earth — you know, civilization and all that stuff — we’ve still managed to type of make a mess of things. We already know that mankind isn’t very good at preserving what nature has already built, but we’re also not great about conserving the history of our own achievements, especially if there aren’t laws and guidelines in place to tell us how far is too far. Now, a Canadian scientist is suggesting that we take a proactive approach when it arrives to preserving other worlds. In a new paper published in Acta Astronautica, Jack Matthews of Memorial University of Newfoundland and Sean McMahon of the UK Center for Astrobiology ask for a universal agreement to be reached with regard to preserving both essential natural and historical sites on other celestial bodies. “A global agreement to protect the most essential sites is needed before it’s too late,” Matthews said in an interview with CBC. The two scientists explain that, thanks to the sharp increment in private space exploration and more countries aiming to travel the cosmos than ever before, other worlds are at risk of being utterly exploited before anyone has a chance to
Tech World Breaking News| Future Information Technology News

Facebook user auctions his personal data on eBay for 99 cents

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A Facebook user found out just how beneficial personal data can be when he auctioned off his social media history on eBay this week. The bid began at 99 cents and climbed to nearly $400 before it was shut down by the e-commerce site a day later. Oli Frost, a writer and developer from the U.K., encouraged people to purchase his personal information on Monday, which included every like, post and comment he’s made since age 16; his listed interests, his friends list, event invitations and a family tree, among other things. “Everyone else’s making money off it, so why shouldn’t I? Sell it to advertisers or whatever you want,” Frost said in a blog post detailing the sale. He only had one rule: Don’t steal his identity.The bidding was supposed to conclude on June 3, at which Frost said he’d give the lucky winner a flash drive of all the data,  downloaded through Facebook’s data export tool under account settings. He planned to donate the earnings to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a nonprofit digital rights group. Within 24 hours, Frost reached a total of 44 bidders and earned a minimum of nearly $400 before his listing was removed on Tuesday for violating Facebook’s terms of service. “Your listing is selling an
Tech World Breaking News| Future Information Technology News

Apple needs Samsung’s help to solve iPhone’s largest issue

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The iPhone X notch is a display design compromise we might have to live with for a few more years, as Apple figures out a way to make a true all-screen iPhone, a device whose display extends from corner to corner with no bezel in sight. To create such a phone, Apple would need to figure out how to place the TrueDepth camera system under the screen right alongside the speaker and sensors. It turns out that to pull that trick off, Samsung’s OLED display-making expertise might be crucial. Samsung showed off a bunch of flexible and rollable OLED screens at SID Display Week, including a few innovations that could help Apple create a no-notch iPhone X. Samsung demonstrated a 4.94-inch 360×112 transparent AMOLED panel with a transparency of 44 %, according to SamMobile. Transparent OLED screens are required for the selfie and Face ID cameras to work, although a 44 % transparency possibly doesn’t cut it. More interestingly, Samsung unveiled an OLED screen that doubles as a speaker. Called “Sound on display,” the screen measures 6.22-inches and has a resolution of 2960 x 1440. Rather than placing the speaker under the screen, Apple could ever turn the entire screen into a
Tech World Breaking News| Future Information Technology News

Scientists know exactly where to look for fossils on Mars

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Nobody knows for sure whether life had ever taken root on Mars. The dry, dusty planet doesn’t seem like a particularly hospitable place these days, but things were likely a whole lot different several billion years ago. Now, a new study suggests that if we’re going to hunt for Martian fossils, there’s one particularly auspicious place we should be searching. The study, which was led by a researcher from the University of Edinburgh, was published in the Journal of Geophysical Research. It focuses on some very specific places on the red planet where fossils are likely to exist, namely inside rocks near long-dead lakes, using knowledge gained from fossil hunting here on Earth to give Mars researchers their best shot at finding evidence of Martian life. “The Martian surface is cold, dry, exposed to biologically harmful radiation and apparently barren today,” the research team — which also includes members of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory as well as scientists from Brown, MIT and Yale, among others — explains. “Nevertheless, there is clear geological evidence for warmer, wetter intervals in the past that could have supported life at or near the surface. This victim has motivated National Aeronautics and Space Administration and European Space
Tech World Breaking News| Future Information Technology News

Memory card of NASA camera destroyed in launch captures fiery final moments

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A NASA photographer was capable to salvage a camera’s memory card and watch the final moments before the gadget was engulfed in flames while filming a launch at a California air base. Longtime NASA photographer Bill Ingalls wanted to shoot the launch of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-on, or GRACE-FO, at Vandenberg Air Force Base last Tuesday and set up six cameras around the launch pad, the agency wrote in a blog post Friday. “I had six remotes, two outside the launch pad safety perimeter and four inside,” Ingalls said. “Unfortunately, the launch started a grass fire that toasted one of the cameras outside the perimeter.” The camera that was placed a quarter of a mile away from the launch pad, the farthest location, was engulfed in flames from the brushfire, destroying the gadget’s body in the procedure. Ingalls returned to the site hoping there was one salvageable piece of the “toasty” camera. The memory card not only survived the fire, but captured the final moments of flames approaching the area and slowing melting the lens. NASA released the fiery footage that showed the plastic casing melting over the lens until the camera stops recording. The four other cameras closest
Tech World Breaking News| Future Information Technology News

Reboot Your Router to Stop Russia-Linked Malware: F.B.I.’s Urgent Request

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Hoping to thwart a refined malware system linked to Russia that has infected hundreds of thousands of internet routers, the F.B.I. has made an urgent request to anybody with one of the gadgets: Turn it off, and then turn it back on. The malware is able of blocking web traffic, gathering information that passes through home and office routers, and disabling the gadgets entirely, the bureau announced on Friday. A global network of hundreds of thousands of routers is already under the control of the Sofacy Group, the Justice Department said last week. That group, which is also known as A.P.T. 28 and Fancy Bear and trusted to be directed by Russia’s military intelligence agency, hacked the Democratic National Committee ahead of the 2016 presidential election, according to American and European intelligence agencies. The F.B.I. has several recommendations for any owner of a small office or home office router. The simplest thing to do is reboot the gadget, which will temporarily disrupt the malware if it is present. Users are also advised to upgrade the gadget’s firmware and to select a new secure password. If any remote-management settings are in place, the F.B.I. suggests disabling them. An analysis by Talos, the threat intelligence division
Tech World Breaking News| Future Information Technology News

NASA’s ‘impossible’ fuel-free engine is actually impossible

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Nobody can beat the laws of physics. NASA is now learning that the hard way after testing a reliability revolutionary new type of propulsion technology that turned out to be, well, impossible from the begin. It’s called the EmDrive and from its inception, it appeared as though the concept flew in the face of physics. Now there’s hard evidence that it really never had a chance of success at all. The EmDrive is a would-be miracle solution for space travel, offering thrust to push a spacecraft through the heavens without requiring a single drop of fuel. It was first conceptualized a little over a decade ago and it is supposed to work by forcing microwaves out of a metal cone which its inventor claimed would produce thrust. Shockingly, early NASA tests of a prototype EmDrive showed that it was indeed producing a tiny amount of thrust. Thanks to the lack of gravity in space, even a small amount of thrust can accelerate a spacecraft to big speeds over time and if the engine didn’t require any fuel it would be a true godsend for deep-space missions. Unfortunately, a new round of research out of Germany is casting some big doubts on those
Tech World Breaking News| Future Information Technology News

NOAA’s brand new weather satellite is already broken

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Remember that awesomely powerful new weather satellite that delivered this really cool lightning-tracking video earlier this week? Yeah, so, funny story, it might already be busted. In a bulletin released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the group explains how its brand new weather tracking tool, GOES-17, has developed a serious issue with its cooling system. According to the bulletin, the satellite’s cooling system “did not start up properly during the in-orbit checkout,” and considering how vital the cooling system is to the overall function and longevity of the satellite that’s a serious issue. “A team of experts from NOAA, NASA, the ABI contractor team and industry are investigating the problem and pursuing multiple courses of probable corrective actions,” NOAA’s statement reads. “The issue affects 13 of the infrared and near-infrared channels on the instrument. The three ABI channels with the shortest wavelength are not impacted.” The GOES-17 satellite is just one of several GOES satellites that NOAA uses to monitor weather across the United States and it was scheduled to perform its observational duties over the Pacific Ocean and a huge portion of the Western US. For the time being, NOAA will focus on figuring out how to correct